Weekly Feature: Covetable Covers.

This week’s Covetable Cover is a well-known classic that many of us have either read at school or have checked off our ‘100 books to read before you die’ lists. I’m not going to tell you what it is straight away, have a look at the symbolic items that are emphasized on the cover and try to work out which book this is….

Got it yet?

This book is extremely well known and many people have read it and are familiar with the symbolic items that are shown here. You’ll notice that the designer did not put the title on the front of the book because the visual description should immediately identify the book to the reader.

This is ‘Lord of The Flies’ by William Golding, a Folio Edition.

The book centers on a group of English School boys who are marooned on a desert island following a plane crash. What starts out as an exciting adventure with no adults, slowly begins to descend into power struggles, savagery and ultimately violence. If you have ever hesitated to read this book, then hesitate no more. It is a little bit of everything, horror, a coming-of age story, an allegory on the human condition. It is a novel about the “The end of innocence, the darkness of man’s heart.”

“Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man’s heart…” 

― William Golding, Lord of the Flies

On the cover we can see what looks to be a young boy turned towards us. Though he is obscured we can see his outline, his hair is a mess and he seems to have broken his glasses. This is one of the, some would say tragic main characters, ‘Piggy’. To the new reader, it raises questions, why are his glasses broken? Why do we only see him in shadow? Why is he surrounded by red? To the returning reader each of these questions has an answer. The glasses are a main symbol in the story which initiates the power struggle and the moment they are broken initiates the descent of the boys into savagery. The fact that Piggy is not seen in detail represents the fact that he is seen as a nuisance by the other boys and that their descent into savagery has made the boys unrecognisable. The red surrounding the figure can simply represent the sunset on the island but also represents the violence and death that is a consequence of their abandoning of their societal rules.

“Maybe there is a beast… maybe it’s only us.” 

― William Golding, Lord of the Flies

Another simple and effective cover for a story that is so well-known it needs no words.

Leave a comment on what you love about this cover, whether you’ve read the book or would like to. I’d also love to hear about the book covers you love!

Feel free to contact me and suggest any beautiful covers you would like to see featured.

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4 thoughts on “Weekly Feature: Covetable Covers.

    • popcorncrunchy July 19, 2019 / 11:33 am

      Not a bad idea, I’ll keep that in mind!

      Like

  1. Dorothy Bowden July 22, 2019 / 7:25 pm

    I loved the explanation of the cover. Not being a very deep thinker or even visually gifted, I had absolutely no idea what it all meant, despite having read the book, albeit some time ago.
    I think a quiz would be a brilliant idea.
    Charlton

    Liked by 1 person

    • popcorncrunchy July 22, 2019 / 9:43 pm

      Thank you very much! Im really glad you enjoyed it and that explanation was clear and entertaining. It’s a great, albeit disturbing, book but one of my favourites. Look out for some more in the future! Thank you so much for commenting!

      Liked by 1 person

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